The Zen of Python

Perhaps the best known collection of Python philosophy was written by Tim Peters, long-time contributor to the language and its newsgroup, comp.lang.python.1 This Zen of Python condenses some of the most common philosophical concerns into a brief list that's been recorded as both its own Python Enhancement Proposal (PEP)2 and within Python itself. Something of an easter egg, Python includes a module called this. Beautiful is better than ugly. Explicit is better than implicit. Simple is better...

Example Plugin Framework

As an application grows, flexibility becomes increasingly important, so attention often turns to plugins and whether the application can accommodate that level of modularity. There are many ways to implement plugin systems and individual plugins, but they all have three core features in common. First, you need a way to define a place where plugins can be used. In order to plug something in, there needs to be a socket for the plug to fit into. In addition, it should be very obvious how to...

The Pareto Principle

In 1906, Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto noted that 80 of the wealth in Italy was held by just 20 of its citizens. In over a century since then, this idea has been put to the test in a number of fields beyond economics, and similar patterns have been found. The exact percentages may vary, but the general observation has emerged over time the vast majority of effects in many systems are a result of just a small number of the causes. In programming, this principle can manifest in a number of...