Developing a Basic Net Xml Application

A .NET XML application will follow most of the same principles you use when working with a static language such as C or Visual Basic.NET. In fact, you might not notice much difference at all except for the obvious structural requirements of a Python application. Consequently, you should find it easy to move your XML code over to IronPython because you really don't have anything new to worry about. Listing 13-1 shows a simple XML application that creates an XML document, saves it to disk, reads...

Using The Ironpython Console

The IronPython console is the best place to begin working with IronPython. You can enter a few statements, test them out, and then work out additional details without too many consequences. In addition, because the console is interactive, you obtain immediate feedback, so you don't have to wait for a compile cycle to discover that something you're doing is completely wrong. In fact, even after you've mastered IronPython, you'll find that you use the console to try things out. Because IronPython...

Working with String objects

Strings are one of the first objects many people use. You write that first Hello World application and marvel when the words appear on screen. In fact, strings are the mainstay of many applications. Without strings you can't provide prompts to the user or ask for input. Sure, you may not do any heavy lifting with strings, but every application out there requires strings to work properly. The following sections discuss the IronPython string object in more detail. One of the problems you can...

Working with xmldomminidom

The xml.dom.minidom module is designed to help you work with XML using the DOM approach. However, this module is far from complete in IronPython, partly due to the CPython support required in standard Python. The actual document support is complete, so you won't have a problem building, editing, and managing XML documents. It's the write and read support that are lacking. Fortunately, you can overcome write issues by using a different approach to outputting the document to disk or other media ....

Understanding the ActiveX Import utility

The example in this chapter relies on the ActiveX Import AxImp utility because it produces the files you need to create a control with a visual interface rather than a component. When you use this utility, you obtain two files as output. The first contains the same information you receive when using the TLbImp utility. The second, the one with the Ax prefix, contains the code for a control. Before you can use AxImp, you need to know a bit more about it. Here's the command line syntax for the...

Debugging With The Clr Debugger

The CLR debugger, CLRDbg.EXE, is part of the .NET Framework SDK. You find it in the GuiDebug folder of your .NET Framework installation or in the Program Files Microsoft.NET SDK v2.0 GuiDebug folder. However, if you installed Visual Studio without installing the SDK, you might not see a GuiDebug folder. In this case, you can download and install the .NET Framework SDK separately. You can obtain the .NET Framework SDK for various platforms at these locations. .NET Framework 2.0 .NET Framework...