Variable Scope

Function definitions create a new local scope for variables. When you assign to a new variable inside the body of a function, the name is defined only within that function. The name is not visible outside the function, or in other functions. This behavior means you can choose variable names without being concerned about collisions with names used in your other function definitions.

When you refer to an existing name from within the body of a function, the Python interpreter first tries to resolve the name with respect to the names that are local to the function. If nothing is found, the interpreter checks whether it is a global name within the module. Finally, if that does not succeed, the interpreter checks whether the name is a Python built-in. This is the so-called LGB rule of name resolution: local, then global, then built-in.

Caution!

A function can create a new global variable, using the global declaration. However, this practice should be avoided as much as possible. Defining global variables inside a function introduces dependencies on context and limits the portability (or reusability) of the function. In general you should use parameters for function inputs and return values for function outputs.

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